Troutbirder II

Troutbirder II
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Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Whitey The Wandering Golden Eagle

This is Whitey, the Golden Eagle. He was accidentally caught in a legal trap in southwestern Wisconsin. Discovered by a bow hunter, he was brought to the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, Minnesota. From there he was immediately transferred to The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota.
With expert care the bird’s leg was eventually repaired. Whitey was then scheduled to be released back into the wild. The National Eagle Center and several public and private agencies all joined together in a partnership to further study wintering golden eagles in the area. To aid the study, satellite transmitters were provided by the Minnesota DNR Non-Game Wildlife Division. For years there has been speculation as to where the Goldens, who winter in the Mississippi river valley, come from. Do they migrate from their heartland in the mountain west, across the great plains to Minnesota. Or do they come from the far north in Canada. Whitey might be able to provide the answer. On March 24, 2009, at The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota a satellite transmitter was attached to the back of this golden eagle. Whitey was than brought to the release site near where he had been first trapped in Wisconsin. Then Scott Mehus, education director and Golden Eagle surveyor at the National Eagle Center, threw the bird back into the wild. Whitey took off, landed briefly in some nearby trees and then soared away, "free as a bird." Tomorrow we will follow him as he leaves his wintering grounds, in the summer of 2009, and head off for parts unknown.

11 comments:

  1. Interesting.

    I'm not sure how I feel about those transmitters. It's pretty hard to believe the bird can function at 100% wearing one of those big things.
    Marnie

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  2. Thanks for sharing your post today. I really enjoyed it.

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  3. Nice post! I look forward to reading more.

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  4. Great post! I loved reading about the "Golden" and seeing him soar off must have taken your breath away!

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  5. Beautiful golden eagle! Thanks for stopping bye my blog and that last line was bad. I should have deleted it. Bad timing I know.

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  6. Interesting post and great pictures. Please keep us posted about what is learned of those eagles' migratory habits. They are powerful birds with the capability of long migrations. You might be interested in learning of the raptor research center in Boise, ID. It is a favorite place to visit when the grandchildren are visiting. Little kids are mesmerized by these powerful and regal birds. http://www.peregrinefund.org/default.asp

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  7. I'll keep an eye on your Blog to follow this. How interesting! Do you suppose he flies over me? We're right smack on the migration path for many species!

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  8. Fascinating post. I will be looking for the next installment of Whitey's eagle adventure.

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  9. Kia ora TB,
    Go Whitey! I don't much like the transmitter stuff either, but the more we who have put the plight of these beautiful creatures into peril, the more we need to learn and understand.
    Cheers,
    Robb

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  10. It is wonderfil that they have been able to make these transmitters small enough to be attached to animals and birds now. There is so much to still learn about them. Does this one also submit photographs TB?

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  11. Very cool! Thanks for sharing. :)

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