Troutbirder II

Troutbirder II
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Monday, October 25, 2010

Troutbirder Breaks The Law

It all started innocently enough. As described in the previous post, a recent hike along the Shooting Star Bike Trail had revealed some beautiful Asters & Stiff Goldenrod. I also noticed dozens of other prairie plants gone to seed. Although I had some Compass Plants growing (a type of native sunflower) I hoped to add another, the Cup Plant, to my small plot of wildflowers.

A little foraging along the bike trail with an ice cream bucket and a few envelopes seemed like a good idea. It happened a few days later.
In the interest of complete disclosure, I did have several accomplices. We found some dried cup plants and several other seeds including rattlesnake master, milkweed and purple coneflowers. A few of each were gathered.
Some time later I was discussing prairie restoration with the local guru. It was then that I was informed that I had been in violation of state law. "But the bike trail is thirty miles long and there are zillions of these plants along the way. Plus I'm not digging anything up, and it wasn't in a State Park. " "Makes no difference. Removal of seeds from any state property, be it park, forest, trail or anything else is strictly illegal." I bowed my head looking properly chastened and humbly repentent. Unfortunately, the "lesson" continued unabated until I'd had enough. "Perhaps an anonymous suggestion to the anti-terrorism authorities that they give up their fruitless search for Osama Bin Laden and come after the Bike Trail seed robber would be in order. While your at it, mention the toilet papering tree defacers from the local high school during Homecoming week.


Just to be on the safe side, me and the Mrs. will be heading on the lam to a hidden location in Ireland for the forseeable future. Wish us luck!

27 comments:

  1. I hope you are getting some sleep after confessing.Swap with others is always a good idea.There are companies that do sell some varieties, but when they have a native mix it isn't always going to be all native to your particular area since they could have procured some varieties from another state.

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  2. Join the crowd. We camped in Canada in Sept. I picked up three small rocks from the beach of Lake Superior after breakfast. One the way out of the park, we went to the lovely interpretative center. There was a very small sign on the bulletin board about how no one is supposed to take any rocks. Then they had the math about how the number of rocks added up. But we weren't going back to the beach, so......

    Then in NC, where we were last week, my hubby, who is nuts about trees, kept seeing trees he didn't know and couldn't immediately identify in the tree books he had along, so he "lifted" a couple of leaves to use as bookmarkers in his books. Including an American Chestnut leaf. so it goes.

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  3. I can understand a law that says you can't dig up plants, but one that forbids taking a few seeds.....ridiculous and meant to be broken.

    You can always hide out here if necessary. I rarely get raided.

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  4. LOL! I hope that wasn't your house that got t.p. I'm assuming you kept the seeds. What's that saying, it's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.

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  5. Oh My you are in a fix..I do have some seed I have collected over the years from our Private Property..I can send you some if you like. My email is in my profile..just send me your address..I have lots of Coneflower and some Ratibida ( Mexican Hat) and who knows what else..no cup plant ..or Rattlesnake weed that I know of.
    I am sure Ireland is a bit drastic..but have fun whilst you are hiding out:)
    BTW..Birds and other animals transport those seeds all over in their poop..and they don't even get a citation:)

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  6. Replying to comment by Far Side of Fifty: well there is the excuse!!! "But officer, I didn't pick the seeds up; my dog brushed alongside the plant and when we got home I had to comb him for fleas and ticks...."

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  7. Kia ora TB,
    While on the lam in Ireland be careful of imbibing in the local distilled product. It has been known to loosen tounges.
    Cheers,
    Robb

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  8. I hope it felt good to confess, but I think native plant propagation is an hororable reason to commit a crime (how's THAT logic for ya? ;-)

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  10. LOLOL! Oh, you are a regular law breaker, you are! :c)

    Have a GLORIOUS time in Ireland! Can't wait to hear all about it and see your photos!!!

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  11. It is always the good stewards of the environment that gets 'the talk' and even sometimes that talk is from an official. The ones who dig and really steal from the area never seem to get caught. Go figure. The way I look at it is you were perpetuating the species-never a bad thing and what harm can it cause to the area to just collect seeds?

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  12. Weren't there some hitch-hiker seeds on the dog too?

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  13. Doesn't take much for you to give up your accomplices, does it?

    I think it's wonderful that you are having some wild seeds and I can't see any damage you may have done.

    Good luck on the lam in Ireland. Hope both of you have a safe and wonderful trip.

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  14. Look at you, getting your gangsta seed collector on! I suppose there's a very good reason behind the law, but next time, you could glue some velcro to your pants and if a few seeds happen to stick...

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  15. Okay, TB, aka Sticky Fingers! The customs people might have you on their radar now that you've confessed. Be careful!

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  16. I hope you had a safe getaway and are now out of reach of the seed police. Do they have a way to prevent wind, birds and other critters from removing seeds?

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  17. Great post, TB--had me chuckling all the way. And good for you to plant natives in your yard--always the best policy (but I guess we all have to watch our sources :>). I have enjoyed browsing posts I missed while we were away and particularly liked hearing about your adventure on Albert Lea Lake. Have a super Irish advernture!

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  18. I’m all for crimes supporting nature! Spread the seeds.

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  19. If you don't violate at least 3 or 4 archaic and often nonsensical laws a day, you just aren't trying hard enough.

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  20. Oh my. Such escapades! Ireland sounds like the perfect hideout.

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  21. Just thought I would let you know Ray that the man with the lions who you did an article about was mauled by one of them. Sadly, it had to happen. They are wild creatures and can never be tamed but some people just cannot understand this.

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  22. I'll follow the trail of milkweed and coneflowers. ;) *L*

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  23. I know it seems a tad silly not be be able to have a few seeds...but I guess they look at it how people get plants and seeds from foreign places plant them and then these plants take over native plants in the area. Just a thought...at lot of folks are not as savvy as you when it comes to plants.

    so did you plant the seeds?

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  24. Ha Ha...cute post!! Hope your wildflowers take ;-)

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  25. This made me laugh out loud...very funny. You didn't mention if you had to turn the seeds you collected over to the guru. BTW, he looks familiar.

    donna

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  26. Lol! Thou shalt not plant the seeds of evil!

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