Troutbirder II

Troutbirder II
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Saturday, June 8, 2013

Baron To The Rescue

I had mentioned in my previous post about "yard birds" a tiny warbler who was rehabbing in my cooler when I took his picture. Several people had asked for the story which I had posted several years before. Well here's the story....
 
"Recently, the new editors of the Minnesota Ornithological Unions, Minnesota Birding magazine asked their members to submit "Real Stories of Minnesota Birders." So I did. It was a post from Sept 23, 2008 titled "Bird Rescue." Imagine my surprise when reading the March/April, 2011 issue of the magazine I came across a story titled "Baron to the Rescue." While somewhat abbreviated from the original, I recognized the hero dog immediately. Here's the original post......

I was sitting in my reading chair in the living room, deep into Steven Pressfield’s new novel, "Killing Rommel." The LRDG (Long Range Desert Group) was about to set out on their desperate mission, as new 8th army commander Bernard Law Montgomery was attempting to hold the line against Afrika Korps, less than 80 miles from Alexandria. There was the thump of heavy artillery and ooops... it was something that just hit the window. I rushed outside to find Baron (my GSD) mouthing a tiny bird. "Drop it," I ordered. Like a good soldier he complied.
I picked up the tiny creature stunned but still alive (barely). Walking into the garage I found a rag and placed it and then the bird into an empty beer cooler. With a cat in the house and a curious dog that followed my every move, I determined the safest temporary refuge for the bird was to place it into a empty  cooler.Heading back into the house, I found my trusty Peterson birding book and began searching for an identification. Probably a warbler I thought. I had narrowed it down to several LBJ’s but nothing conclusive. I decided to wait an hour or so and then check to see if the bird was still alive. I took the cooler out into the garden and carefully opened the lid. The bird had previously been laying on its side barely breathing. Now to my utter astonishment, it was sitting perfectly upright with a "I just woke up and where in the heck am I" look about him. I took several pictures. Here he is looking at me in mutual astonishment.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Then he tried to fly but kept crashing into the side of the cooler. I carefully picked him up and set him on the ground. We looked at each other for a few seconds . I took another picture.

Then he just flew away into the woods. When I downloaded the digital pictures I saw the conclusive proof. He had pink legs. It was an ovenbird. The first one I had ever seen....."
Later,  I received a comment about my post from a lady who belongs to a group who during there morning walks in downtown Rochester, Minnesota, counts and sometimes rehabs birds who have crashed into the windows of tall buildings.  The most numerous victims tend to be ovenbirds, who being a "woodsy" species tend to be unfamiliar with the dangers of big city life.

24 comments:

  1. Loved this story. How cool they included it. I've never seen an Oven Bird.

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  2. Baron and you are both Heros! Way to go! Great rescue story! :)

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  3. Great story with a happy outcome! I was on vacation with my wife when an ovenbird crashed into the hotel and landed in the Mystic River.That one didn't make it.

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  4. I had never heard of an Oven Bird so I looked it up this morning and thought it interesting that its song goes teach'er, Teach'er,TEACH'er!

    Good story, teacher!

    Jo, Up North

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  5. You must have something about you that birds sense you are not an enemy. If I had picked it up, I've no doubt it would have gone into a wild frenzy until it escaped. I'm amazed it set on the ground long enough for a photo.

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  6. awww. sweet little guy - and one i've never seen.

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  7. Wonderful story, TB! I so like the ones with happy endings!

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  8. Great rescue story. You and Baron make a very good team.

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  9. Great story of the oven bird. I see tons of different birds about my place but only can ID about half. Even with a book. Pink legs, who would have thought to look for pink legs -- I would have thought the bird was some type of sparrow. Maybe a song sparrow. Oh well, I enjoy birds even if I am not good at identifying. -- barbara

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  10. Nice story! The only Oven Bird I've ever seen ( and gotten photos of) was one that had flown into our glass deck doors. He recovered and went on his merry way.

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  11. Have never heard of the oven bird -- what a great story!

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  12. What a great story and how neat that he posed for a picture as a "thank you."

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  13. Hi tb...what a great story! What a good boy Baron is! I'm so glad you were able to save that little guy and I'm so happy the magazine printed your story.....you're famous!!

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  14. Thanks for visiting, but most of all THANK YOU for picking up the beautiful Ovenbird and saving it!

    I have a big picnic basket (woven wicker) in which I have twig branches etc. and I place stunned birds in there, then carry them to the park and release them when they're up and about.

    Happy day,

    Sharon Lovejoy Writes from Sunflower House and a Little Green Island

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  15. a heartwarming and educational tale, with nothing lost in the retelling! thank you, as always, for sharing your knowledge and for your life-saving efforts on behalf of our fellow creatures!

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  16. A sweet tale and so glad that you and Baron saved the day. I have never seen an Oven Bird, hmmmmm.....

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  17. Hello...I'm so glad you stopped to visit and then take time to leave a comment for me. Your introduction of yourself allows me to meet and greet another birder...one, like me...I started photographing birds 'late in life'...in fact, just this past year, year and a half. And not only is there exercise, but I've learned a lot about birds, breeding, and id'ing.

    Your story reminds me of one that I found who had just flew into a store front window here in Corpus Christi, and it too was stunned. I took it home - just blocks away and put it in a box in our garage...it soon recovered and it was then released back into the great outdoors. It was a Nashville Warbler. As I told the story --I was informed to purchase some window decals for MY patio doors/windows --they're frosted/translucent decals that I CAN see through, but the birds can detect the image/decal and fly AWAY from it.

    Anyway, Loved this post and read your 'yard bird' post also.

    Nice to meet you. Do stop by again soon ---I post photos once each Saturday afternoon ---and I also have another personal blog Hootin' Anni's [link on my birding sidebar]

    Have a great week.

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  18. I have them! But I never worried about what they were... they were just one more sparrow or warbler hanging out on the ground with the rest of the bunch.
    My lab used to pick up birds for me, such a gentle mouth! Good for Baron!

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  19. Baron was a good dog to treat the bird so gently. I've never even heard of an ovenbird, but I'm glad the woods got that one back.

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  20. Loved the story. The "mutual astonishment " photo is pretty amazing to look at :)

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  21. Sweet story!! We have those here and I also thought they were a sparrow. Great photos of your rescue!!!

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  22. Always nice to read a story with a happy ending! I've never heard of an ovenbird before, but perhaps I've seen them and thought they were something else. Good for Baron--my Golden Retriever wouldn't have been so helpful, I'm afraid.

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  23. this is a wonderful story. I had a dog once who despite himself was a menace to a bird family try to learn to fly... the little birds would hop around the grass my GSD would come have an inspection and sometimes mouth them though always gentle and I'd have to pull him off so the parents could come help the fledgling home. Those birds moved their nest the following year!

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