Troutbirder II

Troutbirder II
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Sunday, April 28, 2013

Theresa Bugnet


It was love at first sight.
I might have met her sitting at a sidewalk cafe with friends in Tours.
 
Or perhaps along the Champs Elysee in Paris?
 
Did I take a chance on the Montmartre with Mrs. T, on the far left in the red jacket, keeping an eye on the revelers outside the Moulin Rouge?
 No, it wasn't any of these romantic places. I learned later, Therese, this delicate French flower, while of Gallic antecedents, was actually from Canada. Her father George Bugnet was a novelist, scientist, poet and settler born in France. He and his wife had migrated to Alberta, where it took 25 years of work and research to develop her. He crossed the wild Alberta rose with the Kamchatka rose of Russia.
She is almost a grandmotherly type now, having been around for more than 50 years. She was actually living along the driveway, next to the house, we bought in 1970. I was new to gardening then and didn't even know one was supposed to cover roses in the harsh winter climate of Minnesota. She wasn't bothered at all.

Although a sunny girl, she has done quite well with our move into the woods next door. A spot on the edge, that is partly sunny, seems to suit her just fine. Her children live nearby, as I have made cuttings and with an ice cream pail, potting soil, some Saran wrap and a little hormone powder they got a good start in life.
 
 Theresa Bugnet (Tear Reeza Bow Nay).  What a sweetheart!

22 comments:

  1. Quite the famous father in law and a beautiful rose.

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  2. What wonderful roses. I take it that this these gracious ladies have been with you for some time. -- barbara

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  3. Nice to have found such a hardy rose

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  4. Wow, what a beauty! A hardy one to boot. :-)

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  5. Catching up with you after a couple rough weeks... Thanks for the humor and beauty and sharing.

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  6. I know her well, but she struggles here with my lack of watering...she is a beauty. Good for you making your own cuttings..I am going to do that if I ever retire:)

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  7. Very beautiful! The only rose I have is one purchased at a garden club sale, called a rambling rose.
    Pink and pretty.

    Cheers,

    Jo, Up North

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  8. That was a fun tease, TB. I was afraid Mrs. T. was going to be jealous.
    But I'm sure she admires your lovely French Canadian rose as much as you do.

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  9. You had me fooled a wee bit at first also like Janie. At least Mrs. T's competition while beautiful is prickly.
    Wonder if rose years are measured like dog years.

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  10. She is a BEAUTY---and I love the way you have taken such good care of her for all of these years... Bet your wife is jealous, huh???? ha ha

    Cute post.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  11. You always make me smile! Such a cute post!
    Your misses and the roses are beautiful!
    Big hugs for you today my sweet friend!
    xo Catherine

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  12. Love the story -- and you almost had me going there! :)

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  13. What a beauty indeed! And a charming story.

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  14. It looks like a beautiful rose.

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  15. I've enjoyed catching up. You never fail to make me grin. I loved the 2nd honeymoon pictures, I'm jealous of your list keeping, and such a beautiful rose and so hardy!!...still humming "Blue" as well!

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  16. You must have a green thumb ... I can never get roses to grow! I love your sense of humor ... and assume your wife does too !

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  17. A nice tribute to a lovely Rose! I have never seen the Nutcracker or the Woodpecker you show below! Thanks for the share as I learned a couple of new birds today!

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  18. Oh I love this I had no idea what you were talking about right to the end. Great post she is a beauty. B

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  19. You two have a fairytale romance! What a lovely tribute to your sweetheart and soulmate.

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