Troutbirder II

Troutbirder II
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Sunday, November 3, 2013

North Dakota Potatoes

We, with our friends John and Joanne, took an overnight train trip (on Amtrak) to Devils Lake North Dakota.  Mainly to take a look at the amazing expansion of that lake in the last decade. More on that in a later post. Northeastern North Dakota has long been famous for sugar beets and potatoes. It so happens Johns cousin is a former manager of a potato "house" (storage facility).  Just in time for the harvest we were invited to take a look.  To my astonishment, I as even allowed to climb aboard a giant machine where big trucks were unloading the harvest.....
 
 
 
French fries anyone?
 

26 comments:

  1. I love taters when fresh.This is a lot easier than digging them.

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  2. Wow! That is a lot of potatoes. :-)

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  3. Lots of potatoes there! We stayed the night at Devil's Lake in 2007 when we went to the Ohio Air Show. I was very uneasy there, and not a fan of all that water.

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  4. Looks like a big operation.

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  5. Did you see Spuds Mackenzie anywhere ?

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  6. Looks like a good trip. I hope you took a photo of Devil's Lake:)

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  7. Ahhhh--a train trip! I would love it. My Dad worked for the railroad and we did alot of traveling on trains BACK in the DAY!!!!!

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  8. I could make lots of potato soup! Did you bring home some taters?

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  9. I remember visiting a beet sugar factory in Michigan when I was about ten. I went with my grandfather and father -- we climbed up metal stairs into a high building and could look at the beets being processed as we climbed. It was a very primitive process compared to your description -- of course that was 60 or so years ago. Like you I was amazed they would let a young child climb those shaky open metal stairs and you being able to climb up on that huge machinery. -- barbara

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  10. We go out to a field here where they let us pick up the spilled potatoes. This year a truck had upset so they said help yourself.

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  11. Wow, TB, North Decoder! What is next on your traveling agenda?

    I hope you brought back some spuds with you to enjoy over the fall and winter.

    Cheers,
    Jo, Stella and Zkhat

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  12. I'll be interesting in hearing more about your train trip out to ND.

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  13. Those are a lot of spuds!!
    xo Catherine

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  14. Ooh, I would love a train trip. What a neat idea. Right now I am having a potato craving.

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  15. How wonderful! I love fresh potatoes!

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  16. I grew up in Minot and spent time camping, with my family, at Devils Lake. Great memories!

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  17. Very neat. I did not know North Dakota grew taters-and definitely did not know the US grew sugar beets. In Germany this time of the year roadways were always clogged with slow going trucks hauling the sugar beets. I haven't thought of them in years but loved that time of the year. How are these potatoes sold? Fresh or used in processed foods?

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  18. This is very interesting. I have seen some large fields where spuds are grown in Idaho. I went to college where many sugar beets were raised. I

    I think Tina has an interesting question. How are these potatoes sold?

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  19. This looks like a fun place to visit! Our kids would've liked it, too.
    Looking forward to what you have to share about your Devil's Lake experience. I've only passed through, might have stopped for lunch. North Dakota sure is booming right now.

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  20. It must have been fascinating to visit the potato house. It's hard to imagine all those potatoes being gathered in one location.

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  22. Wow! That is a lot of potatoes. Now I have a hankering for Five Guys and fresh french fries!!

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  23. Cool truck! Potatoes are big in Maine too. Up in the county, kids get a week off school to harvest them.

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