Troutbirder II

Troutbirder II
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Monday, April 9, 2018

Snowy Owl

From Maine to Washington State a rare visitor from the Northern Canada had been  showing up that winter in the northern tier of States. In what is called an irruption, snowy owls had migrated south in search of food. Mrs. T & I traveled across Minnesota in search of them with no luck. Finally, in late March, the reports of sightings ceased . Apparently, these beautiful birds were returning to their natural habitat in the far north. I had given up hope for my first ever sighting. And then early one morning the phone rang. It was my friend and birding mentor, Mr. Science (Gary). A snowy owl had been spotted less than ten miles from our home. Mrs T and I rushed out the door headed for the scene.
Gary and his wife Bobbi were standing on a gravel county road as we arrived. "Is he gone"? I asked worriedly. Both pointed across the road to the ditch, where a magnificent snowy owl sat in the grass looking right at us..... Snowy owl pictures have been all over the blogoshere this winter but seeing one in person is another experience all together. Staring right at me and not moving. Wow! Take a look.








The snowy just sat there. Unmoving. They are notoriously not easily frightened by people as they live in the far north where few people are found. Still, something didn't seem quite right. We all backed away to discuss the situtation. After some time she made a few awkward hops and even spread her wings. It was time to call for help. The help was found at the Houston Minnesota Nature Center. There an annual Owl Festival is held and Karla is the expert. Because of the liklihood the owl was injured, she recommended capture. However, the locals who were expert and experienced could not be reached. Would we volunteer to do the job? With some trepidation, the answer was yes. She explained how to do it. Next in Part II THE SNOWY OWL RESCUE.







14 comments:

  1. That's great to read ... as it sounds like she was successfully rescued and is now on the road to recovery ... lovely photos - though one sad looking owl ... thanks for posting for us and highlighting Houston Nature Centre - love the logo! Cheers Hilary

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  2. Thank goodness you were there. Can't wait to hear about the capture.

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  3. Apparent;y they make their way thru this region too, but I have never seen one. Now I await the rest of the story, you scoundrel. :)

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  4. Good find. As a child on the farm we saw many on irruption years.

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  5. Oooh I was enjoying the read and there you go telling me to wait for the rest of the story. I am an impatient soul!

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  6. We have had a few near the farm down here.

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  7. Thank you for this post. I hope he/she was rescued and will recover.

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  8. Dear Troutbirder, I'm eager to find out about the rescue. Such a magnificent bird. It's wonderful that not only did you get to see her but that you also are going to get to rescue her. Peace.

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  9. Thanks for sharing. It's great you got to see a snowy owl. The photos you took are amazing. Some great up close shots too of the owl just hanging out. Have a great day.
    World of Animals

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  10. ooooh...I can't wait for the rest!

    Snowy owls were seen on the lakefront in downtown Chicago this year. I haven't seen them, but there have been documented sightings. Beautiful creatures!

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  11. That owl was checking you out ... just like you were doing to it ! As to your comment on my latest blog, I remember just about any exaggeration as being ... as "(blank) as Carter's little Liver pills."

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  12. Sorry the owl isn't feeling well but so happy for you you got to see one! I searched for them in the farm fields around Hastings MN and was rewarded several years with seeing one. Definitely highlights of my birding life!

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