Troutbirder II

Troutbirder II
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Sunday, July 2, 2017

The Land of Saints and Scholars Day 1

Day 1. Arriving in early morning, after an overnight flight from the Twin Cities, we went south along the coastal expressway towards Glendalough in County Wexford. Leaving the four laner, we headed up into a beautiful hill and valley country. The narrow but well maintained highway passed small scattered woodlands, and rock walled fields teeming with flocks of sheep. It took a little while to get used to being on the "wrong" side of the road as this picture reveals.













Our destination was the famous St. Kevin's monastary revealing the early origins of Christianity on the island. It dated back to the 6th century. The monastery sat on a hill overlooking a beautiful valley. Take a look.....
The monastery at Glendalough was enclosed within a circular wall. Unlike Benedictine monasteries, Celtic monasteries embraced entire families; men, women, their children and animals lived in the outer walls, while the celibates lived within the inner walls. In these worlds within the walls, they prayed and worked together in unity with all creation. The cathedral was destroyed by the English in the 14th century.

This very early Christian history of Ireland was a revelation to me. From hence came the saints and scholars, who traveled to England, France, Germany and beyond to help Christianize and bring learning to much of Western Europe.











































































Reflecting back now on this 2010 trip, I recall that the idea for it came from Mrs. T.'s "bucket list." Initially reluctant because I was somewhat aware of the Irelands tragic history. It was our bus driver/guide who leavened the trip with both honesty and humor and who helped make the trip such a joy.  The fantastic scenery didn't hurt either as we loved every minute....:) 






13 comments:

  1. Ireland is a beautiful country, both North and South. Glad you enjoyed it. It's a few years since I was there, the last time was when my Joe reached his 60th birthday and I took him across the sea to Dublin. I had kept the visit a secret and enjoyed the look on his face when he realised where he was going. It was his first visit.

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  2. That wrong side driving is maddening isn't it? I am so glad you are taking us along as you relive this trip. Sounds like you had a terrific guide.

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  3. I can almost read your thoughts when you shot that stream. Just got done cleaning walleye for late lunch, got 5.

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  4. Your last two posts are fascinating. How lucky to have seen it all and a memory never to be forgotten.

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  5. The early Irish Christianity was quote different from the rest of them.

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  6. What beautiful pictures, TB. I have never been to Ireland, but its wonderful history has always interested me. Plus I love the sound of English spoken with an Irish brogue. :-)

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  7. This type of post is the closest that I will ever get, so carry on.

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  8. I love taking this trip with you. Love the history and photographs as well.

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  9. What a lovely time of year to be in Ireland. Glendalough is one of my favorite places in the whole world. It's just magic.

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  10. What an awesome trip you had.... I loved all of the photos --and that kind of road is exactly my favorite type of road to travel..... Thanks for sharing.

    Happy 4th to you.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  11. Hi Troutbirder! This is an excellent post. So glad you decided to revisit Ireland and share your trip with us. What a great trip you had. I have to wonder how great it was to be a social studies teacher enjoying all that history. I loved all the photo. That 5th photo ... the stream ... it reminds me of some places in Montana but, of course, the hard wood trees give away that it wasn't in the Rocky Mountains. Now, I want to thank you for your comment left for me today on my blog. I sure admire you living, when a youngster, on a bluff above the Mississippi and the railroad tracks. You will know that I love trains and there are some right down below our place here but I cannot see them. I can hear them but they are down below a ridge and I can't see them. Thank you for the kind words about the ocean-going vessels. Always good to hear from you! Hope you and yours are having a good summer. Thanks again!

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  12. Dear Troutbirder, if you want to know more of the history of Ireland and how monks went from there to Europe to take Christianity there, I'd suggest a book you may already know about. It's by Thomas Cahill. I'm not remembering the title--something about the Gift of Ireland. I read it several years ago and was amazed. Peace.

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